iCloud

By Rebecca J. Hogue & Madeleine Montpetit

iCloud is an umbrella term used for the various cloud-based services provided by Apple. iCloud services are integrated into all your Apple devices (iPhone, iPad, Mac). iCloud services are actively being developed and evolving, and as a result, new features are being delivered on a regular basis.

iCloud provides services that help to make your iPhone, iPad and laptop more secure. At a minimum, we strongly recommend that you enable iCloud for the Find My Phone functionality.

Please read the following article specifically addressing how you can make your iPhone and iPad more secure when using iCloud in the medical context: iPhones, iPads and HIPAA-Compliant Practice: Locking Down Your Apple Device.

In addition iCloud can be used  to synchronize some of your data from your iPad and iPhone to the cloud. When you enable iCloud on your device, you can configure iCloud synchronization for each type of data individually.

Which services you choose to use are up to you. This will depend on your personal strategy for backup and cloud-based synchronization services available. At a minimum, I highly recommend you turn on Find My Phone as it aligns with the HIPPA-Compliance Practice.

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As a general rule, before using any cloud-based application you should consider the security and privacy policy of the company providing the app. Most companies that provide cloud-based services provide an overview of their security and privacy policies on their websites.

For example, if you are concerned about the privacy and security of any of the data you choose to store in iCloud, review the iCloud security and privacy overview.

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Passwords abound in today’s internet enabled society. To make our internet use more secure, it is recommended that we use different passwords for each website we access. It quickly becomes impossible to remember all the passwords required to manage our internet use safely. Password Managers are software applications that were created specifically to allow you to securely store and conveniently retrieve your passwords, allowing you to implement unique random passwords for each website you use. In addition, some of the password manager tools allow you to securely store credit card numbers and other important information.

Recently Apple has introduced a new feature known as Keychain that provides password management services. This feature provides many of the same functions as some of the leading password managers; however, it only works on Apple products and software (e.g. iPhone, iPad, Mac, Safari).

If you are going to take the time to implement a password manager solution, at this time we recommend that you use a full service solution such as 1Password. Applications such as 1Password integrate with all mobile devices and all web browsers on both Mac and PC platforms. This means you only need to remember one password (make sure it is a good one) in order to access each of your unique website password.

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Find My Phone is an iCloud service that allows you to track the location of any iPhone, iPad, or Apple computer that is configured with the Find My Phone Service.

To configure the Find My Phone service on your iPad:

  1. Open the Settings app.
  2. Select iCloud.
  3. At the bottom of the list, ensure Find My Phone is selected.

If you have not enabled iCloud, you will need to first activate iCloud. Select Settings > iCloud and follow the prompts (see Managing your Apple ID).

The Find My Phone functions are activated by logging in the iCloud website (http://iCloud.com). After logging in, touch Find My Phone, then select a device from the My Devices list at the top center of the page. Once you select a device, the Find My Phone options are displayed.

FindMyPhone

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Shutting down your iPad

By Rebecca J. Hogue

There are two ways to shut down the iPad: (1) normal shutdown, and (2) force shutdown.

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normal shutdownUnder normal operations, you do not need to shutdown your iPad. However, if your iPad is operating slowly or a specific app is crashing or failing to load properly, you may wish to shutdown and restart your iPad. In addition, if you don’t expect to be using your iPad for an extended period  for example, a week while on vacation) , you may wish to shutdown the iPad to prevent the battery from draining.

To shutdown the iPad:

  1. Hold down the sleep/wake button until the slide to power off prompt appears.
  2. Touch and slide to power off.

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ForceShutdownIf while you are using your iPad, an app causes the device to lock up, and you are not able to close the app, you may need to force the iPad to power down. This type of force shutdown does not remove any data from your device, it simply powers down the iPad. You can then restart the iPad by holding the power button.

To force shutdown, hold both the sleep/wake button and the home button until the device powers off (about 3 seconds).

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Battery Saving Tips

By Rebecca J. Hogue

Contrary to popular belief, leaving apps running on your iPad has very limited impact on your iPad’s (or iPhone’s) battery life. There are a few things you can do to maximize your battery life: (1) turn down the screen brightness, (2) close apps the use location services, (3) use airplane mode when you do not need cellular or wifi, (4) drain your battery once a month.

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The brighter your screen is, the more battery power is required. To save battery life, turn down the brightness to the minimum you need to see the device clearly. In iOS7, you can easily adjust screen brightness using the Control Center, by swiping up from the bottom on the screen.

 

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LocationServicesLocation services are used by apps such as Google Maps. These are very convenient when you are using your device to navigate (e.g. as a GPS when doing house calls). However, location services drain the battery. You can tell when location services are being used by the location services icon (arrow) on the top right of the screen next to the battery indicator.

To maximize battery life, close any apps using location services immediately after using them. For example, after arriving at your destination, close the Google Maps app.

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AirplaneModeAirplane mode automatically turns off any send and transmit functions, including Cellular, WiFi, and Bluetooth. After turning on Airplane mode, you can manually re-enable WiFi and Bluetooth.

If you know you will be in an area with limited cellular service, turning on airplane mode will prevent your device from constantly checking for service. This will significantly increase your device’s battery life; however, you will not be able to send or receive telephone calls with Airplane mode enabled.

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Apple recommends that you fully drain and recharge your devices once a month. This does not make the battery last longer, rather it re-calibrates the battery life indicator. This helps to keep the estimated batter life indicator more accurate.

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Closing Apps

By Rebecca J. Hogue

All apps remain open on the iPad, even after you navigate to the Home page or open a new app. However, there are times when you may wish to actually close apps. In particular, some of the medical education apps are memory intensive (e.g. Anatomy Atlas). Leaving these memory intensive apps open may slow down your iPad, or may prevent other apps from opening.

Leaving apps open has little or no impact on your devices battery life. If you are concerned about the battery life of your devices, see Battery Saving Tips.

To close apps, double click the home button. You can then scroll through the apps until you find the one you want to close. On the app you wish to close, swipe upwards.

Apps

By Rebecca J. Hogue

Apps (short for Applications) are programs that run on your iPad. Each apps is represented by an icon on the iPad home screen.

This section describes:

  1. How to purchase apps.
  2. How to delete apps.

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Unlike your desktop, all applications for the iPad are purchased and downloaded using a single application known as the App Store.

To purchase an app:

  1. Open the App Store by touching the App Store icon.
  2. If you know the name of the app, touch the search bar and enter the name.
  3. Touch Search.
  4. Touch the price of the app (e.g. if the app is free, touch FREE).
  5. Touch INSTALL.
  6. When prompted, enter the password associated with the displayed Apple ID. When the app has downloaded, the price button changed to OPEN.

When you purchase an app, that app is associated  with the Apple ID that was used to purchase the app. When you wish to update that app, you will need to know the password for the Apple ID for which it is associated.

Note: if you are not able to recover an Apple ID password associated with an app, the only way to update the app is to delete it and re-purchase it from the App Store using an Apple ID that you do know.

To check which Apple ID is being used by the App Store, see Settings > iTunes & Apps Store.

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To delete an app from the iPad:

  1. Begin by touching and holding the app. After a couple of seconds the apps begin to jiggle.
  2. You will notice an x in the top corner of any app that can be deleted. Touch the x to delete the app.
  3. Press the home button to stop the apps from jiggling.

Deleting an app from the iPad does not delete your purchase from the App Store. If you decide later that you want to re-install the app you can. This is useful if you need space on your iPad now, you can delete apps (even ones you paid for) to free up space, and re-install them later when you need them.

If you find that your iPad is automatically downloading apps even after you delete them, check your Settings for the iTunes & App Store. Go to Settings > iTunes & App Store. There are buttons to toggle on/off the Automatic Downloads for Music, Apps, iBooks, and Updates.

Settings > iTunes & App Store

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Managing your Apple ID

By Rebecca J. Hogue

Your Apple ID is your identity in the Apple ecosystem. It allows you to buy apps in the App Store and update your iPad’s operating system. In addition, your Apple ID is used for messaging, iBooks purchases, and iCloud backup and file transfer.

When you initially configure your iPad, you enter one Apple ID; however, the iPad will allow you to use a different Apple ID for each service. For example, my husband and I share an Apple ID for our App Purchases. Most Apps allow you to install the App on up to 5 devices. Having a shared ID allows us to buy apps once. We each have our own unique Apple ID for messaging and for iCloud backups. The unique ID ensures that we are not sharing contacts, calendar, and device configuration data. For most people, I recommend two Apple IDs. One family ID for shared purchases and another unique per person ID for messaging data associated with individuals. Specifically, I recommend setting up the following using individual and family accounts:

Individual:

  • iCloud (to change the Apple ID associated with iCloud, you must delete the current configuration first)
  • iMessages
  • FaceTime
  • Game Center

Family:

  • iTunes & App Store – Note, you may be asked to confirm your credit card information. You can either confirm it or hit cancel. In both cases, your Apple ID will be updated
  • Music – Home sharing feature (if you change the Music Sharing setting, it also changes the Video sharing setting)
  • Video – Home sharing feature (if you change the Video Sharing setting, it also changes the Music sharing setting)

When you download an app, it is associated with your current App Store Apple ID. When the app needs to be updated, you will be required to enter the password associate with the Apple ID that was used to purchase (or download) that app. If you no longer have access to that Apple ID, you will not be able to update that app. If it is a free app, the easiest solution is to delete the app and then re-add it with your current App Store Apple ID.

Reference: iPad User Manual, section “Apple ID”

This video shows how to change your iCloud Apple ID.